podcast

Ep 4: Jacki Buys Josiah & Stevie Stacionis a Drink

By The ThirstyNest Editors

Episode 4: Jacki will interview Josiah alongside her husband Stevie Stacionis, who owns Bay Grape, one of the coolest wine shops in CA! They’ll chat about how they met in the restaurant business and share their go-to drink during happy hour.

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Jacki Strum:

Hi there and welcome to Can I Buy You a Drink? A podcast from the ThirstyNest team, where we interview our favorite wine and wedding folks about their meet cute stories and what's in their glass right now. I'm your host, Jacki Strum, Founder and CEO of Thirsty Nest, the first wine and spirits registry for the modern couple. I'm really excited to welcome my guests today. Josiah and Stevie, who own one of the coolest wine shops I've ever seen in one of my favorite neighborhoods in Oakland, California. It's called Bay Grape, a bottle shop with benefits and has everything from canned wine parties to sold out educational classes. They've really created an environment that brings accessible curiosity of wine to life. Hi guys, how's it going?

Stevie:

Hi.

Josiah:

Hi.

Stevie:

We're great.

Jacki Strum:

Very good. Very good. It's a hot day, but it's beautiful out. So, happy to be here with you guys.

Stevie:

Nice. We're super glad to be here.

Jacki Strum:

I really appreciate you joining me today. I'm sure you're very crazed right now running a restaurant and a wine shop. Could you tell me what a normal day is kind of looking like right now for you guys?

Josiah:

Being woken up by our toddler at 5:30 in the morning with him asking for snacks and then, bringing us like, assorted Lego sculptures that he does which is kind of cool.

Stevie:

Yeah, and then making breakfast and lunch for him and trying to get ourselves together and trying to answer quick emails and the old requests from the delivery driver who can't get in and doesn't know the alarm code, and dropping kid off, coming in, bringing in recycling and trash and picking sundry items that have been spewed out in front of the store. Then, sit down and try to bust through a few emails and work and admin stuff before the shop and the restaurant for lunch and doorway service. Then, we try to support our staff and lend extra hands wherever needed for orders and guest relations and all that good stuff. Then, skedaddle out about as fast we came in at 4:30 to pick up said toddler and usually don't waste more than 20 seconds past 5:00 to have a drink.

Jacki Strum:

A well deserved drink, I think, after all of the-

Stevie:

Yeah.

Josiah:

Yeah.

Stevie:

Then, play and wrestle and cook and clean and pass out.

Jacki Strum:

Nice. I assume, is that very different than pre-COVID, your routine?

Stevie:

In some ways yes-

Josiah:

Yeah.

Stevie:

... and in some ways no. I mean, all of the home stuff is the same. It's just sort of condensed. Then, the shop and restaurant definitely look very different from previous life. We're not really doing any dinner or evening service at either of the shop bar or the restaurant. That feels a lot different. We used to kind of ... one of us would head home to pick up the kid and the other would stay through service and get home at 11:00 at night and make dinner for ourselves and kind of decompress then. We go to bed shortly after our kid does. That's definitely different.

Jacki Strum:

Yeah, and I'm sure it's like a new normal that has some benefits and obviously some not benefits. It's nice to see him a little more, I'm sure. I have the same situation, seeing my toddler all the time. I did want to dive into a little bit of your background of how you guys met because your story of how you met kind of follows your path with wine and I thought it was just such a cool background story. So, let's go back in time. How'd you guys meet?

Josiah:

Stevie and I worked together at a restaurant in Pasadena called Il Fornaio.

Jacki Strum:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Josiah:

She was a server, I was a bartender, and just like most server/bartender relationships, it's like a love/hate relationship. I thought she was into me at one point, and then-

Stevie:

He asked me out and I said no.

Josiah:

Yeah, she like totally [crosstalk 00:03:58] and helped me clean the bar and she didn't have to do that. I thought, "Oh, she's hitting on me."

Jacki Strum:

You're like, "This is a signal."

Josiah:

Yeah, I asked her for her number and she was like, "No, I'm good." I'm just like, "Ugh, whatever." Then, we ended up going ... we were supposed-

Stevie:

Then we got in a huge fight.

Josiah:

Oh, yeah. Because she wanted [crosstalk 00:04:16]-

Jacki Strum:

[crosstalk 00:04:16] dating, you got in a fight?

Josiah:

Yeah. She wanted me to make a chocolate milk during Sunday brunch and we didn't have the syrup, so I literally had to make a hot chocolate and then cool it down. But down the craziness of mimosas and all these crazy drinks that I had to put out. I was like, "I don't have time."

Stevie:

The drink was listed on the kid's menu-

Josiah:

I didn't see it.

Stevie:

... and there was a screaming toddler, which now we all know what that's like. I'm like, "Just make the drink, it's on the menu."

Josiah:

Yeah, I kind of refused ... or, I did actually, but with so much sass that it made her really upset.

Stevie:

There was also the casual moment when I borrowed your car after a staff party-

Josiah:

Oh, yeah.

Stevie:

... to go and hook up with another colleague.

Jacki Strum:

Oh, my god. Wow.

Josiah:

I think it was New Year's or something. We were all hanging out and we went to a friend's house. She came over and later in the night, she's like, "All right. I'm going to go." This was before Uber and Lyft and stuff. So, I was like, "Just take me car. Just bring it back." She's like, "Okay. Cool." So, she took it, but then she went and hooked up with some other dude and then, I'm like, "Okay. Can you bring me my car the next morning," and she's like, "No. I really can't. Can't you just like come over here and get it." I'm just like-

Stevie:

[crosstalk 00:05:31] so rude.

Josiah:

... "You're an asshole."

Josiah:

I was so rude.

Josiah:

[crosstalk 00:05:32] F you, I'm not into you. I just want my car back.

Stevie:

The point is that we did not get along for a long time.

Jacki Strum:

And yet, somehow this sounds romantic anyway because it's kind of like in a rom com where they hate each other and that's how you know it's going to work out.

Stevie:

So then, our manager at the time had set up a wine tasting trip for a bunch of the staff members to go up to Santa Barbara. We were in LA. We didn't know that much about wine at the time, but were really interested because I mean, at the time, Il Fornaio in Pasadena crushed it, especially in terms of high-end wine sales.

Josiah:

It was crazy.

Stevie:

We made bank.

Jacki Strum:

And did you learn a lot from the job before this trip?

Josiah:

Yeah, for sure.

Stevie:

A little bit. Our manager definitely was one that would like quiz us on wines and on appellations and really helped foster that interest in both of us. He set up this tasting trip for everybody on the staff to go to Santa Barbara, and on the day of the trip, everybody had flaked out except the two of us. Again, we're not really getting along super well, but kind of begrudgingly were like, "Well, you know, our manager set this up. We should do this. It's going to be cool to see the wineries." So, we went-

Jacki Strum:

And so, you were totally alone, no one's guiding you-

Josiah:

[crosstalk 00:06:52], right.

Josiah:

Yeah.

Jacki Strum:

... just the two of you with your past haunting you in the car ride?

Stevie:

So, that past was really influential because-

Josiah:

I feel like we were like completely honest with each other and there was no [crosstalk 00:07:04] or trying to put up this façade of who we were and how we felt. I was dead honest with her. Everything that was going on in my life. I had just got out of a really long relationship, it was the longest of my life which was like a year and two months. Then, I cut loose, and I was just like, "You know what? I'm just going to go crazy," and so, I was hooking up with all sorts of people and it was really fun-

Jacki Strum:

As a bartender that kind of comes with the territory, right?

Josiah:

It was too easy. It was like-

Josiah:

[crosstalk 00:07:33]

Josiah:

... I got in a lot of trouble.

Stevie:

He was very honest about where he was at in his life. I was honest about where I was at in my life as had just been previously mentioned on this recording, I had gotten out of that phase and was like, "You know what, the next person that I see is going to be really serious and I'm not interested in just casually dating. I've run that game and I'm over it." So, we came to the whole day, having these open, honest conversations and just being friendly, which I think [inaudible 00:08:02] a really meaningful [crosstalk 00:08:04] future.

Josiah:

Yeah. I wasn't expecting anything at all either because Stevie classically was known for only dating tall, white dudes with like, blonde hair. I'm [crosstalk 00:08:13]-

Jacki Strum:

Which is not you.

Josiah:

Yeah, I'm like super dark, Filipino, dark hair, really tan. At this point, I'm just like, "Yeah, it's just not going to happen." So, I'm going on this trip with a friend more of like-

Stevie:

Sure. So, the whole day goes great. We're amazed. It's like, free drinking, all these wineries are showing us around and really hooking it up. So, on the drive home, we're like, "Oh, we're going to stop." It was right after Sideways has come out. We're like, "Oh, my gosh. Hitching Post." We stopped at Hitching Post. Then, we're driving back and it's now like, 9:00 at night and we're on the freeway in Carpentaria and Josiah's truck, the engine starts smoking-

Jacki Strum:

Oh, my god.

Stevie:

So, we pull over. He calls his mechanic. He had just bought this truck used and super janky-

Josiah:

[crosstalk 00:09:02], yeah.

Stevie:

... and the guy says, "You definitely can't drive that. You got to get a tow." So, of course, 9:00, 90 miles back to LA, nobody-

Jacki Strum:

After a day of drinking. You're exhausted I'm sure.

Josiah:

Yeah, and I'm really trying to get out of this situation too because I'm like, I don't really need to stay the night with this girl, plus I think I was supposed to meet up with another girl or whatever that night.

Jacki Strum:

Wow.

Josiah:

I'm calling my grandma just being like, "Grandma, can you please call AAA for me," and she's like, "Oh. I can't, honey. Not until tomorrow morning." I call one of my bar back friends and he's already drunk, so he's just like, laughing, being like, "Shut up. Stop playing with me." Then, yeah, nobody could pull through-

Stevie:

So, the only response is to rent a Motel 6 room and wait it out.

Josiah:

I got one with two beds because I was being a gentleman and just like, "Whatever. We're going to sleep in separate beds."

Stevie:

The rest is history. That was it.

Jacki Strum:

Did you have a moment when you were getting the hotel room, where you were like, "Two beds?"

Josiah:

No, I really did it just because like, I'm a gentleman and I was just like-

Josiah:

[crosstalk 00:10:07]

Josiah:

... "I don't want this girl to feel like all awkward-

Jacki Strum:

Pressured, or yeah. For sure.

Stevie:

We were both set on two beds until we cracked into the case and a half of wine that we had purchased, and we were like, "This is awkward. We're going to spend the night together. Let's open some wine." Then, the rest is history.

Jacki Strum:

Wow.

Stevie:

I will say after that trip, Josiah kept calling me asking me if I would give him a ride to go and look at a new car and then, casually like, "Oh. Do you want to get dinner after?" All this stuff-

Josiah:

Because I had to like, repay the favor. She was driving me all around looking for cars and I was like, "At least I can buy her dinner," you know?

Jacki Strum:

Yeah.

Stevie:

A few months later, we were spending every day and every night together and studying wine together. Yeah, that trip really, I feel like, ignited our interest in wine and-

Josiah:

We have separate beds.

Jacki Strum:

Cute.

Josiah:

Just kidding.

Stevie:

No, we don't.

Jacki Strum:

It's a good idea for a successful marriage. I hear that. And business partnership. That's so cute. That's such a good story. It's so funny that you were telling him the next guy is going to be the serious one, and it was him all along. So cute.

Josiah:

Yeah.

Jacki Strum:

When did you decide to make your moves to New York, because that's where I feel like it sounds like you really figured out a career in wine so quickly, the two of you.

Josiah:

That whole thing started because we definitely wanted to get out of LA and just kind of like, experience something different. Stevie applied for a Fulbright scholarship to Japan and then, that fell through, and so, we already had that momentum of, "Let's move somewhere else." So then, we decided to go to New York just because it would be really good for Stevie's food and travel writing and then, my wine studies. So, we literally ... it was like, I would probably not do this again now that I'm older. But we had ... how much did we have in our savings, like $600?

Josiah:

[crosstalk 00:12:05]-

Josiah:

Yeah, it was really minimal and moved out to New York without any jobs or anything. We just went out there with a couple of recommendations from friends. Yeah, it was crazy. Yeah, we decided to go out there and just kind of cut our gums a little bit. For us, it was more like going to college. We were just like, "Let's just go out here and really enhance our studies and get some really great jobs, that way we can come back to California and do some stuff."

Jacki Strum:

How did you get introduced to ... Josiah, you met some really big hitters in the wine industry. Where did you start in New York?

Josiah:

I worked at the Oak Room when that was reopening in The Plaza Hotel. That's where I met Josh Nato, who works for Andrew Carmilini. He's the beverage director of all this restaurants now. Then, from there, I went to Bar Boulud and worked under Daniel [inaudible 00:12:59] and Michael Madrigal, which was so fun and so amazing. I really learned a lot from those guys. They were incredible. Then, from there-

Stevie:

Well, wait. Before that, Josh also, I think, plugged you into the court system, yeah?

Josiah:

Oh, yeah. Then, I did the whole court of master thing, studied with a bunch of really great people that are now just absolutely killing it. Like, Pascaline. Studied under-

Jacki Strum:

Oh, I love Pascaline. Yeah.

Josiah:

... Morgan, all these ... just like, Jordan Sausalito. It was really cool just to, I don't know, now looking at everybody, I'm like, "Wow. We were all on the same tasting group together meeting on Tuesday at 8:00 AM in the morning studying," and now, we all are kind of doing our own thing. It's really great to see. So yeah, did the whole court thing. Continued to study that. Then, in New York, I met Raj [inaudible 00:13:51] at Terroir or something like that. Then, he was like, "Yeah. Whenever you come back to California, just let me know. I'll hook you up." I'm like, "Great." So, we decided to move back and Raj gave me a job at [inaudible 00:14:07] and shortly thereafter, I passed my advanced-

Jacki Strum:

[crosstalk 00:14:10] names are all like, dream jobs in the wine industry that you're just dropping right now. So, that's a very cool way to [crosstalk 00:14:17]-

Josiah:

[crosstalk 00:14:17] really dope. They are so ... looking back, I'm like, "Man. I was so lucky." But at the time, it was just like, you're just working your ass off. You're constantly just working and tasting and studying. It was a lot. I don't think I could do that now with a kid. It was perfect timing. All we had was Napoleon who's our firstborn. It was crazy in New York because then, Stevie was on a completely different schedule. So, she was 9:00 to 5:00 and I was more 2:00 to 1:00. So, we literally ... I think during the week, we only had one day-

Stevie:

It was one Friday per month.

Josiah:

Yeah, one Friday per month that we had off together. Then, we would occasionally see each other for a couple of hours on weekends. Other than that, we didn't see each other at all. But it all paid off. Yeah.

Jacki Strum:

Yeah. Stevie, you were at Crush for a while too, and then, you met Laura [inaudible 00:15:11]?

Stevie:

Yeah. Again, I went out to New York originally with the intention of working in the publishing industry and the magazine that I was working for folded because it was 2008. All the publications that I was aspiring to work for were folding. So, right as I felt like I had gotten out of hospitality and like, made it as a writer, I had to go back sort of into hospitality. I got recruited to do the writing for Crush Wine and Spirits. So, I would write emails about Raveneau, wines that I had never had and really at the time, didn't know anything about. So, I learned a lot about fine wine there and kind of what it meant to work in the collectable side of the industry, which for an early 20-something girl, I think, really made an impression in a number of ways. It was actually through Josiah that I got connected to Laura Manic, who was opening [crosstalk 00:16:19]-

Jacki Strum:

Okay.

Stevie:

... and so I just like, fangirled out and was like, "Would you ever meet up sometime for a drink so I can pick your brain about what it's like to be in the industry?" She was like, "I'm opening this new business," and, "Do you want to come and be my first employee?" So, I got to work closely in tandem with her, which was completely invaluable for ultimately starting my own business, getting to see the ways that she approached all of that brand building and launching her business was amazing. Then, when we moved out to California, I continued working with her. She put me in touch with the guild of sommeliers. So, I did a lot of communication and content for them as well.

Jacki Strum:

Wow.

Stevie:

Then, we got [crosstalk 00:17:07]-

Jacki Strum:

How did you guys ... yeah, I was just going to say how did you guys decide to work together?

Stevie:

I think we just always like, missed, just by our rocky start perhaps, we missed working together and really, were on very opposite schedules for so long. So, it was weird to be working in the same industry but never together. so, actually for a period of time, we started this little fun side project/hobby that was called A Drink with Friends. It was like, a YouTube channel where we talked about wine and learned other skills from other professionals while we taught them about wine. It was silly and ridiculous but it honestly, I think, made us get even more fired up about the possibility of working together again.

Jacki Strum:

That sounds really fun and a good way to make contacts and everything, connections and friends in the industry.

Stevie:

For sure. Then, we honestly stumbled across this space in our neighborhood in Oakland as we were walking to the Farmer's Market one day. The paper had fallen down in the windows; it had been closed and vacant for about three years. The space was beautiful and it was what it now Bay Grape and we just started casually talking about, "What a cool space. What would you put there? What do you think the neighborhood could use?" And obviously, wine was central to that discussion for us. We talked a lot, probably six months, casually and then, not so casually about, "Oh. We would want it to have classes and an educational component, but really be community based." All these things that we loved about wine we tried to sort of build into this idea. The more seriously that we started talking about it, the more it became something that we really ... I don't know, we talked our way into it. Reached out to the landlord and sent just a one-sheet outlining what we were thinking of doing. He got back to us and said, "That sounds really interesting. Let's talk." We went through another probably six months of negotiations and conversations before we ultimately signed a lease and moved in.

Jacki Strum:

Very cool. What made you decide ... obviously, it sounds like you were already living in Oakland, but what about Oakland is great for opening a new business?

Stevie:

I feel like we just really were in love with the community here and the neighborhood and it goes without saying, Oakland is incredibly diverse and incredibly progressive and forward thinking. I feel really honored to be a part of a community that's constantly raising the bar for our fellow humans.

Jacki Strum:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), that's such a nice way of putting it. It's true.

Stevie:

Yeah. And it's also ... I mean, we're right on Lake Merritt, which is this incredibly vibrant hub of activity of walking and biking and barbecuing and boating and all walks of life kind of come together around this lake. So, for us, getting to be in the center of that, I think, was really ... I don't know, exciting. It felt like while this area is so residentially developed and vibrant, commercially, it was really underserved. Again, there were so many vacant storefronts in our little [crosstalk 00:20:20]-

Jacki Strum:

Yeah.

Stevie:

... so, I'm very sensitive of this idea of gentrifying. We're really mindful of not pushing anyone out, but rather, taking over a space that had been sitting vacant. We felt like we had something unique to offer an already amazing community.

Jacki Strum:

Well, it sounds like they responded so well because you were telling me when you were able to have classes, they were mostly sold out, right? And everybody-

Stevie:

Yeah.

Josiah:

Yeah.

Jacki Strum:

... they were super popular.

Josiah:

Yeah, people really seemed to ... I mean, I just think it's like something that ... I don't know, I would like to see a lot more wine shops do which is basically just like, teach people, educate people, don't make people feel intimidated because wine is so intimidating. Even for me when I go somewhere, I'm coming in with a hoodie or something and I'm like, yawning, people look at me and like, "Who's this kid and what is he going to steal?" But [crosstalk 00:21:15] here at the shop we really make it a point to treat everyone with respect and literally, just like take the time to talk to people. With that, you also have to be pretty well educated in wine and so that's why we're constantly opening bottles every day with the staff and constantly talking to them about wine. And also, the way that we hire. We don't really hire people that come from a wine background mostly. We hire people that just have an interest in learning about wine and have a drive to work hard and also play hard. And a strong sense of hospitality. I feel by hiring that way, you kind of even the playing field a bit because you have these people that know how it is to not know everything about wine or to be intimidated by wine shops. So then, they almost are more loving and more cool to people that come into the shop.

Stevie:

It's so much more accessible.

Josiah:

Right.

Jacki Strum:

Yeah, because then you feel like you're talking to someone who gets you, who gets where you're coming from. That's so cool. I love that. Actually, I think I was telling you guys my best friend lives around the corner from your shop and she loves it. So, I know the neighborhood well. It's beautiful. So, I remember last time we spoke, you guys were creating these really cool kits for people to take home right now. Is that still something you're doing?

Stevie:

Yeah. Well, so, we've been talking a lot about how both businesses that we've built, obviously we've just talked about Bay Grape. But MAMA Oakland, the restaurant as well, has really been focused on this sense of creating community and people feel safe and nourished and yeah, like they're in community. Now, with COVID, all of that has been shut down. It's like, the very core essence, our like, reason for being has been shut down. So yeah, we're like, "Okay. We can still sell bottles of wine, but it's not the same." At the restaurant, we switched from a three-course prefixed dinner menu to sandwiches, which is great. I'm proud of the product, but it's not the same. So, [crosstalk 00:23:16]-

Jacki Strum:

Right.

Stevie:

... trying to think of ways to create that same feeling and that same excitement and yeah, sense of being like, safe and cared for and nourished only being able to offer to go products-

Jacki Strum:

And like, connecting with people even if it's to go.

Stevie:

Yeah, and again-

Jacki Strum:

That makes perfect sense, yeah.

Stevie:

... [crosstalk 00:23:33] some sense of hospitality. So, Josiah and I kept talking around what else could we offer that would be true to our concept and also make people feel those things. Josiah had the awesome idea of making these kits that not only had food, but beautiful and thoughtfully put together and had extra little ... I call them ambiance touches to [crosstalk 00:23:59]-

Jacki Strum:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Stevie:

... feel like they could have a special night and be cared for besides just-

Jacki Strum:

That feels like such a dreamy hospitality kind of-

Stevie:

We're dreamy.

Josiah:

[crosstalk 00:24:10] feel good and taken care of. I feel like, it doesn't cost anything. You just got to put a little thought into it and a little bit of love and you can do it.

Stevie:

But it's the same way that like, honestly, hospitality professionals, I feel like true hospitality professionals are trained to think about like, how does it feel when you slip into the banquette. Like, literally, how does it feel on your booty. How does this napkin feel on your hands. It's like, all these little tiny touches that you don't necessarily consciously notice but are either contributing to a feeling of unease or a feeling of ease and relaxation and comfort. So, little things like, when we were getting even high-end to go food from some wonderful restaurants that really deliver beautiful product, it was annoying to me that the flaps of the boxes were in the way and little tiny bits that just didn't contribute to this like, overall feeling of ease. So, the boxes are designed to do that. So, there's basically a three-course menu. It's a seasonal salad. I literally shop at the farmer's market that morning and then build the salads. Then, there's our signature [inaudible 00:25:21] or my grandmother's red sauce with pasta, a little nugget of cheese that you get to grate yourself. And then, cannoli that you get to pipe yourself. Plus, wine pairing, so there's sparkling rose, a white, and a red that goes with the meal. Then, a little bud vase with a flower-

Jacki Strum:

Oh, that's so cute.

Stevie:

... a votive candle, a mug with tea that's like a take home mug. Then, Josiah made a playlist so you can scan to play the playlist. It's all packaged with little crinkle paper and it has like a whole menu that you unroll that talks through like, "Okay. Here's what you're going to do. Make sure your table is cleared of clutter. Put your phone away." It just, I think ... obviously, I'm totally biased, but the feedback we've gotten too is that it makes people feel special. Those tiny touches, even the way that the box folds together are nice rather than like, "We're just here to serve you food."

Jacki Strum:

It's like you're creating a memorable moment even if it's at home that will stay with them.

Stevie:

Yeah.

Josiah:

Yeah.

Stevie:

We're super proud of them and I feel like if hopefully we can get back to some semblance of normal business, although I'm not confident it'll be any time soon, and so, in the meantime we're really proud of the way we're able to add an extra bit of service and hospitality to the simple product that we can deliver.

Jacki Strum:

Yeah. Wow, I'm so impressed. I wish I could get one myself. I only have one more question for you guys and it's what you're drinking when it's 5:01 every day. What are you really interested in right now?

Josiah:

Stevie's been [crosstalk 00:26:57]-

Stevie:

I am on a vermouth kick. [crosstalk 00:27:00]-

Jacki Strum:

Oh, okay.

Stevie:

... the summer of vermouth. I was going to make a vermouth club that people could subscribe to and like, learn about vermouth because I got super turned onto it when we were in Barcelona a little over a year ago. I've been drinking Samantha Sheehan's Mom and Pop, de Pamp, it's a grapefruit vermouth and it's so good with ice. Then, I eat little Castelvetrano olives and almonds on the side and I just pretend I'm on vacation in Europe.

Jacki Strum:

That sounds so lovely. What about you, Josiah, is it the same? Are you guys sharing it?

Josiah:

No, it's weird. I've been drinking a lot of beer lately. For me, right now, my top beer that I feel like I drink a lot of is the Heater Allen, it's a pilsner from McMinnville, Oregon. It's just really, really, really good. I don't know. After tasting wine all day, like most somms or wine buyers would say, they just kind of want something a little different. But yeah, it's really, really tasty. Yeah.

Stevie:

Then, we get cases of sample bottles delivered because people aren't yet allowed to pour. So, we just get all these sample bottles and we try to crush through a huge lineup up them. By that point, after tasting a bunch, we have 7/8 of the bottle still left and we deliver them to our neighbors.

Jacki Strum:

Oh, that's so nice. Talk about community, I would love to be your neighbors if that's what you were doing every night.

Josiah:

It's cool too because one of our neighbors, they have a garden. So, they've been dropping off produce for us in exchange because we just give them wine. So, it's pretty rad.

Jacki Strum:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). That's a good exchange, that's a good COVID community thing. We've been doing that with our neighbors. We give them wine in exchange for toddler toys. I feel like we're the winning ... that exchange right now.

Stevie:

[crosstalk 00:28:47] able to find little ways to celebrate community right now, that's an awesome way to do so.

Jacki Strum:

I totally agree. Well, thank you guys so much for joining me today. I loved hearing your story. It was so dreamy. I'll use that word again, but it really was. I feel like I learned so much about both of you and a wonderful store and vision that you guys created. So, thank you-

Stevie:

Thank you.

Josiah:

Yeah. Thanks for having us involved.

Jacki Strum:

Yeah, of course. And cheers.

Stevie:

Cheers.

Jacki Strum:

Cheers.

Jacki Strum:

You can subscribe to The ThirstyNest Can I Buy You A Drink Podcast on Apple Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear what you think so please write us a review. Use the hashtag #CanIbuyyouadrink and follow us on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. You can also send us an email at Hello@thirstynest.com. The ThirstyNest Podcast is produced by Jacqueline Strum. See you next time, cheers!

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